Join the 3D printing revolution

Media Design School 02 Apr 2012 Comments

  • Harness the potential of 3D printing during a weekend workshop
  • Assemble a 3D printer and use it to print your own 3D object
  • Learn from an expert from HyperWerk University of Applied Sciences and Art in Switzerland

Participants in the two-day 3D Printing workshop at Media Design School will assemble an Ultimaker printer and use it to print their own objects under the supervision of Yvo Waldmeier from HyperWerk University of Applied Sciences and Art in Switzerland. Yvo has a Bachelor in Industrial Design and is renowned for his 3D sculpture.

The art of Yvo Waldmeier The art of Yvo Waldmeier

The art of Yvo Waldmeier The art of Yvo Waldmeier

The workshop is suitable for anyone with an interest in 3D printing technology and open source projects. Programming or electronics skills are not necessary, but would be highly appreciated.

The course will run from Saturday, 21 April to Sunday, 22 April. Course cost is $295. Register now.

A Taste of the Technology

Medical Use

Bespoke Innovations Bespoke Innovations

3D printers are currently being used to create prosthetic ears, noses and fingers for patients. Incredibly, they are also being used to print fully-functional lightweight limbs complete with tattoos.

Fashion and Art

Jewellery by New York designer Alissia Melka-Teichroew Jewellery by New York designer Alissia Melka-Teichroew

Joris van Tubergen recently made an interactive installation - Screaming Room - that transformed the scream of each visitor into a shape printed by Ultimaker creating a unique piece of art every 20 minutes without need for an operator.

Recently, Asher Levine created pieces for Lady Gaga using the technology and jewellery designers are also gagging to get their hands on the technology. Of course, copyright issues will confront these industries going forward, especially if you can download the latest sneakers and print them out at home. 

Build it and they will come

Radiolaria Pavilion in Pontedera, Italy Radiolaria Pavilion in Pontedera, Italy

Radiolaria Pavilion in Pontedera, Italy was created using a 3D printer in 2010. Robotic building system D-Shape developed the first large-scale stereolithic printer in 2008 to allow architects the freedom to create rapid prototypes. The structure is created out of inorganic binder and sand and took a week of continuous printing to create. It only takes 24 hours for the material to full set. So, your next house really could come out of a printer.

Food and the future

Massachusetts Institute of Technology digital food printer Massachusetts Institute of Technology digital food printer

Custom menus, hidden messages within food and instant meals - it’s all on the way. Currently “cooks” are taking control of the nutritional value of printed food and delivering instant gratification. Benefits of printing your food including zero food waste, no packaging, access to wider range of foods and no wait time.

The implications

3D printing would eliminate the need for assembly lines and products could be shipped around the world instantly as digital files and printed at home. Manufacturers could print huge product ranges without needing new tools. Carbon footprints would be dramatically reduced. Labour, packaging and manufacturing industries would shrink at the expense of the design, creative and programming industries. Read all about it.